6.5 Session history and navigation

6.5.1 The session history of browsing contexts

The sequence of Documents in a browsing context is its session history. Each browsing context, including nested browsing contexts, has a distinct session history. A browsing context's session history consists of a flat list of session history entries. Each session history entry consists, at a minimum, of a URL, and each entry may in addition have a state object, a title, a Document object, form data, a scroll position, and other information associated with it.

Each entry, when first created, has a Document. However, when a Document is not active, it's possible for it to be discarded to free resources. The URL and other data in a session history entry is then used to bring a new Document into being to take the place of the original, should the user agent find itself having to reactivate that Document.

Titles associated with session history entries need not have any relation with the current title of the Document. The title of a session history entry is intended to explain the state of the document at that point, so that the user can navigate the document's history.

URLs without associated state objects are added to the session history as the user (or script) navigates from page to page.


Each Document object in a browsing context's session history is associated with a unique History object which must all model the same underlying session history.

The history attribute of the Window interface must return the object implementing the History interface for that Window object's newest Document.


A state object is an object representing a user interface state.

Pages can add state objects to the session history. These are then returned to the script when the user (or script) goes back in the history, thus enabling authors to use the "navigation" metaphor even in one-page applications.

State objects are intended to be used for two main purposes: first, storing a preparsed description of the state in the URL so that in the simple case an author doesn't have to do the parsing (though one would still need the parsing for handling URLs passed around by users, so it's only a minor optimization), and second, so that the author can store state that one wouldn't store in the URL because it only applies to the current Document instance and it would have to be reconstructed if a new Document were opened.

An example of the latter would be something like keeping track of the precise coordinate from which a pop-up div was made to animate, so that if the user goes back, it can be made to animate to the same location. Or alternatively, it could be used to keep a pointer into a cache of data that would be fetched from the server based on the information in the URL, so that when going back and forward, the information doesn't have to be fetched again.


At any point, one of the entries in the session history is the current entry. This is the entry representing the active document of the browsing context. Which entry is the current entry is changed by the algorithms defined in this specification, e.g. during session history traversal.

The current entry is usually an entry for the address of the Document. However, it can also be one of the entries for state objects added to the history by that document.

An entry with persisted user state is one that also has user-agent defined state. This specification does not specify what kind of state can be stored.

For example, some user agents might want to persist the scroll position, or the values of form controls.

User agents that persist the value of form controls are encouraged to also persist their directionality (the value of the element's dir attribute). This prevents values from being displayed incorrectly after a history traversal when the user had originally entered the values with an explicit, non-default directionality.

Entries that consist of state objects share the same Document as the entry for the page that was active when they were added.

Contiguous entries that differ just by fragment identifier also share the same Document.

All entries that share the same Document (and that are therefore merely different states of one particular document) are contiguous by definition.

Each Document in a browsing context can also have a latest entry. This is the entry or that Document that was most the recently traversed to. When a Document is created, it initially has no latest entry.

User agents may discard the Document objects of entries other than the current entry that are not referenced from any script, reloading the pages afresh when the user or script navigates back to such pages. This specification does not specify when user agents should discard Document objects and when they should cache them.

Entries that have had their Document objects discarded must, for the purposes of the algorithms given below, act as if they had not. When the user or script navigates back or forwards to a page which has no in-memory DOM objects, any other entries that shared the same Document object with it must share the new object as well.

6.5.2 The History interface

interface History {
  readonly attribute long length;
  readonly attribute any state;
  void go(optional long delta);
  void back();
  void forward();
  void pushState(any data, DOMString title, optional DOMString? url = null);
  void replaceState(any data, DOMString title, optional DOMString? url = null);
};
window . history . length

Returns the number of entries in the joint session history.

window . history . state

Returns the current state object.

window . history . go( [ delta ] )

Goes back or forward the specified number of steps in the joint session history.

A zero delta will reload the current page.

If the delta is out of range, does nothing.

window . history . back()

Goes back one step in the joint session history.

If there is no previous page, does nothing.

window . history . forward()

Goes forward one step in the joint session history.

If there is no next page, does nothing.

window . history . pushState(data, title [, url ] )

Pushes the given data onto the session history, with the given title, and, if provided and not null, the given URL.

window . history . replaceState(data, title [, url ] )

Updates the current entry in the session history to have the given data, title, and, if provided and not null, URL.

The joint session history of a top-level browsing context is the union of all the session histories of all browsing contexts of all the fully active Document objects that share that top-level browsing context, with all the entries that are current entries in their respective session histories removed except for the current entry of the joint session history.

The current entry of the joint session history is the entry that most recently became a current entry in its session history.

Entries in the joint session history are ordered chronologically by the time they were added to their respective session histories. Each entry has an index; the earliest entry has index 0, and the subsequent entries are numbered with consecutively increasing integers (1, 2, 3, etc).

Since each Document in a browsing context might have a different event loop, the actual state of the joint session history can be somewhat nebulous. For example, two sibling iframe elements could both traverse from one unique origin to another at the same time, so their precise order might not be well-defined; similarly, since they might only find out about each other later, they might disagree about the length of the joint session history.

All the getters and setters for attributes, and all the methods, defined on the History interface, when invoked on a History object associated with a Document that is not fully active, must throw a SecurityError exception instead of operating as described below.

The length attribute of the History interface must return the number of entries in the top-level browsing context's joint session history.

The actual entries are not accessible from script.

The state attribute of the History interface must return the last value it was set to by the user agent. Initially, its value must be null.

When the go(delta) method is invoked, if the argument to the method was omitted or has the value zero, the user agent must act as if the location.reload() method was called instead. Otherwise, the user agent must traverse the history by a delta whose value is the value of the method's argument.

When the back() method is invoked, the user agent must traverse the history by a delta −1.

When the forward()method is invoked, the user agent must traverse the history by a delta +1.


Each top-level browsing context has a session history traversal queue, initially empty, to which tasks can be added.

Each top-level browsing context, when created, must asynchronously begin running the following algorithm, known as the session history event loop for that top-level browsing context:

  1. Wait until this top-level browsing context's session history traversal queue is not empty.

  2. Pull the first task from this top-level browsing context's session history traversal queue, and execute it.

  3. Return to the first step of this algorithm.

The session history event loop helps coordinate cross-browsing-context transitions of the joint session history: since each browsing context might, at any particular time, have a different event loop (this can happen if the user agent has more than one event loop per unit of related browsing contexts), transitions would otherwise have to involve cross-event-loop synchronisation.


To traverse the history by a delta delta, the user agent must append a task to this top-level browsing context's session history traversal queue, the task consisting of running the following steps:

  1. Let delta be the argument to the method.

  2. If the index of the current entry of the joint session history plus delta is less than zero or greater than or equal to the number of items in the joint session history, then abort these steps.

  3. Let specified entry be the entry in the joint session history whose index is the sum of delta and the index of the current entry of the joint session history.

  4. Let specified browsing context be the browsing context of the specified entry.

  5. If the specified browsing context's active document's unload a document algorithm is currently running, abort these steps.

  6. Queue a task that consists of running the following substeps. The relevant event loop is that of the specified browsing context's active document. The task source for the queued task is the history traversal task source.

    1. If there is an ongoing attempt to navigate specified browsing context that has not yet matured (i.e. it has not passed the point of making its Document the active document), then cancel that attempt to navigate the browsing context.

    2. If the specified browsing context's active document is not the same Document as the Document of the specified entry, then run these substeps:

      1. Fully exit fullscreen.

      2. Prompt to unload the active document of the specified browsing context. If the user refused to allow the document to be unloaded, then abort these steps.

      3. Unload the active document of the specified browsing context with the recycle parameter set to false.

    3. Traverse the history of the specified browsing context to the specified entry.

When the user navigates through a browsing context, e.g. using a browser's back and forward buttons, the user agent must traverse the history by a delta equivalent to the action specified by the user.


The pushState(data, title, url) method adds a state object entry to the history.

The replaceState(data, title, url) method updates the state object, title, and optionally the URL of the current entry in the history.

When either of these methods is invoked, the user agent must run the following steps:

  1. Let cloned data be a structured clone of the specified data. If this throws an exception, then rethrow that exception and abort these steps.

  2. If the third argument is not null, run these substeps:

    1. Resolve the value of the third argument, relative to the API base URL specified by the entry settings object.
    2. If that fails, throw a SecurityError exception and abort these steps.
    3. Compare the resulting parsed URL to the result of applying the URL parser algorithm to the document's address. If any component of these two URLs differ other than the path, query, and fragment components, then throw a SecurityError exception and abort these steps.
    4. If the origin of the resulting absolute URL is not the same as the origin of the responsible document specified by the entry settings object, and either the path or query components of the two parsed URLs compared in the previous step differ, throw a SecurityError exception and abort these steps. (This prevents sandboxed content from spoofing other pages on the same origin.)
    5. Let new URL be the resulting absolute URL.

    For the purposes of the comparisons in the above substeps, the path and query components can only be the same if the scheme component of both parsed URLs are relative schemes.

  3. If the third argument is null, then let new URL be the URL of the current entry.

  4. If the method invoked was the pushState() method:

    1. Remove all the entries in the browsing context's session history after the current entry. If the current entry is the last entry in the session history, then no entries are removed.

      This doesn't necessarily have to affect the user agent's user interface.

    2. Remove any tasks queued by the history traversal task source that are associated with any Document objects in the top-level browsing context's document family.

    3. If appropriate, update the current entry to reflect any state that the user agent wishes to persist. The entry is then said to be an entry with persisted user state.

    4. Add a state object entry to the session history, after the current entry, with cloned data as the state object, the given title as the title, and new URL as the URL of the entry.

    5. Update the current entry to be this newly added entry.

    Otherwise, if the method invoked was the replaceState() method:

    1. Update the current entry in the session history so that cloned data is the entry's new state object, the given title is the new title, and new URL is the entry's new URL.

  5. If the current entry in the session history represents a non-GET request (e.g. it was the result of a POST submission) then update it to instead represent a GET request (or equivalent).

  6. Set the document's address to new URL.

    Since this is neither a navigation of the browsing context nor a history traversal, it does not cause a hashchange event to be fired.

  7. Set history.state to a structured clone of cloned data.

  8. Let the latest entry of the Document of the current entry be the current entry.

The title is purely advisory. User agents might use the title in the user interface.

User agents may limit the number of state objects added to the session history per page. If a page hits the UA-defined limit, user agents must remove the entry immediately after the first entry for that Document object in the session history after having added the new entry. (Thus the state history acts as a FIFO buffer for eviction, but as a LIFO buffer for navigation.)

Consider a game where the user can navigate along a line, such that the user is always at some coordinate, and such that the user can bookmark the page corresponding to a particular coordinate, to return to it later.

A static page implementing the x=5 position in such a game could look like the following:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<!-- this is http://example.com/line?x=5 -->
<title>Line Game - 5</title>
<p>You are at coordinate 5 on the line.</p>
<p>
 <a href="?x=6">Advance to 6</a> or
 <a href="?x=4">retreat to 4</a>?
</p>

The problem with such a system is that each time the user clicks, the whole page has to be reloaded. Here instead is another way of doing it, using script:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<!-- this starts off as http://example.com/line?x=5 -->
<title>Line Game - 5</title>
<p>You are at coordinate <span id="coord">5</span> on the line.</p>
<p>
 <a href="?x=6" onclick="go(1); return false;">Advance to 6</a> or
 <a href="?x=4" onclick="go(-1); return false;">retreat to 4</a>?
</p>
<script>
 var currentPage = 5; // prefilled by server
 function go(d) {
   setupPage(currentPage + d);
   history.pushState(currentPage, document.title, '?x=' + currentPage);
 }
 onpopstate = function(event) {
   setupPage(event.state);
 }
 function setupPage(page) {
   currentPage = page;
   document.title = 'Line Game - ' + currentPage;
   document.getElementById('coord').textContent = currentPage;
   document.links[0].href = '?x=' + (currentPage+1);
   document.links[0].textContent = 'Advance to ' + (currentPage+1);
   document.links[1].href = '?x=' + (currentPage-1);
   document.links[1].textContent = 'retreat to ' + (currentPage-1);
 }
</script>

In systems without script, this still works like the previous example. However, users that do have script support can now navigate much faster, since there is no network access for the same experience. Furthermore, contrary to the experience the user would have with just a naïve script-based approach, bookmarking and navigating the session history still work.

In the example above, the data argument to the pushState() method is the same information as would be sent to the server, but in a more convenient form, so that the script doesn't have to parse the URL each time the user navigates.

Applications might not use the same title for a session history entry as the value of the document's title element at that time. For example, here is a simple page that shows a block in the title element. Clearly, when navigating backwards to a previous state the user does not go back in time, and therefore it would be inappropriate to put the time in the session history title.

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<TITLE>Line</TITLE>
<SCRIPT>
 setInterval(function () { document.title = 'Line - ' + new Date(); }, 1000);
 var i = 1;
 function inc() {
   set(i+1);
   history.pushState(i, 'Line - ' + i);
 }
 function set(newI) {
   i = newI;
   document.forms.F.I.value = newI;
 }
</SCRIPT>
<BODY ONPOPSTATE="set(event.state)">
<FORM NAME=F>
State: <OUTPUT NAME=I>1</OUTPUT> <INPUT VALUE="Increment" TYPE=BUTTON ONCLICK="inc()">
</FORM>

6.5.3 The Location interface

Each Document object in a browsing context's session history is associated with a unique instance of a Location object.

document . location [ = value ]
window . location [ = value ]

Returns a Location object with the current page's location.

Can be set, to navigate to another page.

The location attribute of the Document interface must return the Location object for that Document object, if it is in a browsing context, and null otherwise.

The location attribute of the Window interface must return the Location object for that Window object's Document.

Location objects provide a representation of the address of the active document of their Document's browsing context, and allow the current entry of the browsing context's session history to be changed, by adding or replacing entries in the history object.

[Unforgeable] interface Location {
  void assign(DOMString url);
  void replace(DOMString url);
  void reload();
};
Location implements URLUtils;
location . assign(url)

Navigates to the given page.

location . replace(url)

Removes the current page from the session history and navigates to the given page.

location . reload()

Reloads the current page.

The relevant Document is the Location object's associated Document object's browsing context's active document.

When the assign(url) method is invoked, the UA must resolve the argument, relative to the API base URL specified by the entry settings object, and if that is successful, must navigate the browsing context to the specified url, with exceptions enabled. If the browsing context's session history contains only one Document, and that was the about:blank Document created when the browsing context was created, then the navigation must be done with replacement enabled.

When the replace(url) method is invoked, the UA must resolve the argument, relative to the API base URL specified by the entry settings object, and if that is successful, navigate the browsing context to the specified url with replacement enabled and exceptions enabled.

Navigation for the assign() and replace() methods must be done with the responsible browsing context specified by the incumbent settings object as the source browsing context.

If the resolving step of the assign() and replace() methods is not successful, then the user agent must instead throw a SyntaxError exception.

When the reload() method is invoked, the user agent must run the appropriate steps from the following list:

If the currently executing task is the dispatch of a resize event in response to the user resizing the browsing context

Repaint the browsing context and abort these steps.

If the browsing context's active document is an iframe srcdoc document

Reprocess the iframe attributes of the browsing context's browsing context container.

If the browsing context's active document has its reload override flag set

Perform an overridden reload, with the browsing context being navigated as the responsible browsing context.

Otherwise

Navigate the browsing context to the document's address with replacement enabled and exceptions enabled. The source browsing context must be the browsing context being navigated. This is a reload-triggered navigation.

When a user requests that the active document of a browsing context be reloaded through a user interface element, the user agent should navigate the browsing context to the same resource as that Document, with replacement enabled. In the case of non-idempotent methods (e.g. HTTP POST), the user agent should prompt the user to confirm the operation first, since otherwise transactions (e.g. purchases or database modifications) could be repeated. User agents may allow the user to explicitly override any caches when reloading. If browsing context's active document's reload override flag is set, then the user agent may instead perform an overridden reload rather than the navigation described in this paragraph (with the browsing context being reloaded as the source browsing context).


The Location interface also supports the URLUtils interface. [URL]

When the object is created, and whenever the the address of the relevant Document changes, the user agent must invoke the object's URLUtils interface's set the input algorithm with the address of the relevant Document as the given value.

The object's URLUtils interface's get the base algorithm must return the API base URL specified by the entry settings object, if there is one, or null otherwise.

The object's URLUtils interface's query encoding is the document's character encoding.

When the object's URLUtils interface invokes its update steps with the string value, the user agent must run the following steps:

  1. If any of the following conditions are met, let mode be normal navigation; otherwise, let it be replace navigation:

  2. If mode is normal navigation, then act as if the assign() method had been called with value as its argument. Otherwise, act as if the replace() method had been called with value as its argument.

6.5.3.1 Security

This section describes a security model that is underdefined, imperfect, and does not match implementations. Work is ongoing to attempt to resolve this, but in the meantime, please do not rely on this section for precision. Implementors are urged to send their feedback on how cross-origin cross-global access to Window and Location objects should work. See bug 20701.

User agents must throw a SecurityError exception whenever any properties of a Location object are accessed when the entry settings object specifies an effective script origin that is not the same as the Location object's associated Document's browsing context's active document's effective script origin, with the following exceptions:

When the effective script origin specified by the entry settings object is different than a Location object's associated Document's effective script origin, the user agent must act as if any changes to that Location object's properties, getters, setters, etc, were not present, and as if all the properties of that Location object had their [[Enumerable]] attribute set to false.

For members that return objects (including function objects), each distinct effective script origin that is not the same origin as the Location object's Document's effective script origin must be provided with a separate set of objects. These objects must have the prototype chain appropriate for the script for which the objects are created (not those that would be appropriate for scripts whose settings object specifies a global object that is the Location object's Document's Window object).

6.5.4 Implementation notes for session history

This section is non-normative.

The History interface is not meant to place restrictions on how implementations represent the session history to the user.

For example, session history could be implemented in a tree-like manner, with each page having multiple "forward" pages. This specification doesn't define how the linear list of pages in the history object are derived from the actual session history as seen from the user's perspective.

Similarly, a page containing two iframes has a history object distinct from the iframes' history objects, despite the fact that typical Web browsers present the user with just one "Back" button, with a session history that interleaves the navigation of the two inner frames and the outer page.

Security: It is suggested that to avoid letting a page "hijack" the history navigation facilities of a UA by abusing pushState(), the UA provide the user with a way to jump back to the previous page (rather than just going back to the previous state). For example, the back button could have a drop down showing just the pages in the session history, and not showing any of the states. Similarly, an aural browser could have two "back" commands, one that goes back to the previous state, and one that jumps straight back to the previous page.

In addition, a user agent could ignore calls to pushState() that are invoked on a timer, or from event listeners that are not triggered in response to a clear user action, or that are invoked in rapid succession.

6.6 Browsing the Web

Certain actions cause the browsing context to navigate to a new resource. A user agent may provide various ways for the user to explicitly cause a browsing context to navigate, in addition to those defined in this specification.

For example, following a hyperlink, form submission, and the window.open() and location.assign() methods can all cause a browsing context to navigate.

A resource has a URL, but that might not be the only information necessary to identify it. For example, a form submission that uses HTTP POST would also have the HTTP method and payload. Similarly, an iframe srcdoc document needs to know the data it is to use.

Navigation always involves source browsing context, which is the browsing context which was responsible for starting the navigation.

When a browsing context is navigated to a new resource, the user agent must run the following steps:

  1. Release the storage mutex.

  2. If there is a preexisting attempt to navigate the browsing context, and the source browsing context is the same as the browsing context being navigated, and that attempt is currently running the unload a document algorithm, and the origin of the URL of the resource being loaded in that navigation is not the same origin as the origin of the URL of the resource being loaded in this navigation, then abort these steps without affecting the preexisting attempt to navigate the browsing context.

  3. If a task queued by the traverse the history by a delta algorithm is running the unload a document algorithm for the active document of the browsing context being navigated, then abort these steps without affecting the unload a document algorithm or the aforementioned history traversal task.

  4. If the prompt to unload a document algorithm is being run for the active document of the browsing context being navigated, then abort these steps without affecting the prompt to unload a document algorithm.

  5. Let gone async be false.

    The handle redirects step later in this algorithm can in certain cases jump back to the step labeled fragment identifiers. Since, between those two steps, this algorithm goes from operating synchronously in the context of the calling task to operating asynchronously independent of the event loop, some of the intervening steps need to be able to handle both being synchronous and being asynchronous. The gone async flag is thus used to make these steps aware of which mode they are operating in.

  6. If gone async is false, cancel any preexisting but not yet mature attempt to navigate the browsing context, including canceling any instances of the fetch algorithm started by those attempts. If one of those attempts has already created and initialized a new Document object, abort that Document also. (Navigation attempts that have matured already have session history entries, and are therefore handled during the update the session history with the new page algorithm, later.)

  7. If the new resource is to be handled using a mechanism that does not affect the browsing context, e.g. ignoring the navigation request altogether because the specified scheme is not one of the supported protocols, then abort these steps and proceed with that mechanism instead.

  8. If gone async is false, prompt to unload the Document object. If the user refused to allow the document to be unloaded, then abort these steps.

    If this instance of the navigation algorithm gets canceled while this step is running, the prompt to unload a document algorithm must nonetheless be run to completion.

  9. If gone async is false, abort the active document of the browsing context.

  10. If the new resource is to be handled by displaying some sort of inline content, e.g. an error message because the specified scheme is not one of the supported protocols, or an inline prompt to allow the user to select a registered handler for the given scheme, then display the inline content and abort these steps.

    In the case of a registered handler being used, the algorithm will be reinvoked with a new URL to handle the request.

  11. If the browsing context being navigated is a nested browsing context, then put it in the delaying load events mode.

    The user agent must take this nested browsing context out of the delaying load events mode when this navigation algorithm later matures, or when it terminates (whether due to having run all the steps, or being canceled, or being aborted), whichever happens first.

  12. This is the step that attempts to obtain the resource, if necessary. Jump to the first appropriate substep:

    If the resource has already been obtained (e.g. because it is being used to populate an object element's new child browsing context)

    Skip this step. The data is already available.

    If the new resource is a URL whose scheme is javascript

    Queue a task to run these "javascript: URL" steps, associated with the active document of the browsing context being navigated:

    1. If the origin of the source browsing context is not the same origin as the origin of the active document of the browsing context being navigated, then act as if the result of evaluating the script was the void value, and jump to the step labeled process results below.

    2. Apply the URL parser to the URL being navigated.

    3. Let parsed URL be the result of the URL parser.

    4. Let script source be the empty string.

    5. Append parsed URL's scheme data component to script source.

    6. If parsed URL's query component is not null, then first append a U+003F QUESTION MARK character (?) to script source, and then append parsed URL's query component to script source.

    7. If parsed URL's fragment component is not null, then first append a U+0023 NUMBER SIGN character (#) to script source, and then append parsed URL's fragment component to script source.

    8. Replace script source with the result of applying the percent decode algorithm to script source.

    9. Replace script source with the result of applying the UTF-8 decode algorithm to script source.

    10. Let address be the address of the active document of the browsing context being navigated.

    11. Create a script, using script source as the script source, address as the script source URL, JavaScript as the scripting language, and the script settings object of the Window object of the active document of the browsing context being navigated.

      Let result be the return value of the code entry-point of this script. If an exception was thrown, let result be void instead. (The result will be void also if scripting is disabled.)

    12. Process results: If the result of executing the script is void (there is no return value), then the result of obtaining the resource for the URL is equivalent to an HTTP resource with an HTTP 204 No Content response.

      Otherwise, the result of obtaining the resource for the URL is equivalent to an HTTP resource with a 200 OK response whose Content-Type metadata is text/html and whose response body is the return value converted to a string value.

      When it comes time to set the document's address in the navigation algorithm, use address as the override URL.

    The task source for this task is the DOM manipulation task source.

    So for example a javascript: URL in an href attribute of an a element would only be evaluated when the link was followed, while such a URL in the src attribute of an iframe element would be evaluated in the context of the iframe's own nested browsing context when the iframe is being set up; once evaluated, its return value (if it was not void) would replace that browsing context's document, thus also changing the Window object of that browsing context.

    If the new resource is to be fetched using HTTP GET or equivalent, and there are relevant application caches that are identified by a URL with the same origin as the URL in question, and that have this URL as one of their entries, excluding entries marked as foreign, and whose mode is fast, and the user agent is not in a mode where it will avoid using application caches

    Fetch the resource from the most appropriate application cache of those that match.

    For example, imagine an HTML page with an associated application cache displaying an image and a form, where the image is also used by several other application caches. If the user right-clicks on the image and chooses "View Image", then the user agent could decide to show the image from any of those caches, but it is likely that the most useful cache for the user would be the one that was used for the aforementioned HTML page. On the other hand, if the user submits the form, and the form does a POST submission, then the user agent will not use an application cache at all; the submission will be made to the network.

    Otherwise

    Fetch the new resource, with the manual redirect flag set.

    If the steps above invoked the fetch algorithm, the following requirements also apply:

    If the resource is being fetched using a method other than one equivalent to HTTP's GET, or, if the navigation algorithm was invoked as a result of the form submission algorithm, then the fetching algorithm must be invoked from the origin of the active document of the source browsing context, if any.

    Otherwise, if the browsing context being navigated is a child browsing context, then the fetching algorithm must be invoked from the browsing context scope origin of the browsing context container of the browsing context being navigated, if it has one.

  13. If gone async is false, return to whatever algorithm invoked the navigation steps and continue running these steps asynchronously.

  14. Let gone async be true.

  15. Wait for one or more bytes to be available or for the user agent to establish that the resource in question is empty. During this time, the user agent may allow the user to cancel this navigation attempt or start other navigation attempts.

  16. Fallback in prefer-online mode: If the resource was not fetched from an application cache, and was to be fetched using HTTP GET or equivalent, and there are relevant application caches that are identified by a URL with the same origin as the URL in question, and that have this URL as one of their entries, excluding entries marked as foreign, and whose mode is prefer-online, and the user didn't cancel the navigation attempt during the earlier step, and the navigation attempt failed (e.g. the server returned a 4xx or 5xx status code or equivalent, or there was a DNS error), then:

    Let candidate be the resource identified by the URL in question from the most appropriate application cache of those that match.

    If candidate is not marked as foreign, then the user agent must discard the failed load and instead continue along these steps using candidate as the resource. The user agent may indicate to the user that the original page load failed, and that the page used was a previously cached resource.

    This does not affect the address of the resource from which Request-URIs are obtained, as used to set the document's referrer in the initialize the Document object steps below; they still use the value as computed by the original fetch algorithm.

  17. Fallback for fallback entries: If the resource was not fetched from an application cache, and was to be fetched using HTTP GET or equivalent, and its URL matches the fallback namespace of one or more relevant application caches, and the most appropriate application cache of those that match does not have an entry in its online whitelist that has the same origin as the resource's URL and that is a prefix match for the resource's URL, and the user didn't cancel the navigation attempt during the earlier step, and the navigation attempt failed (e.g. the server returned a 4xx or 5xx status code or equivalent, or there was a DNS error), then:

    Let candidate be the fallback resource specified for the fallback namespace in question. If multiple application caches match, the user agent must use the fallback of the most appropriate application cache of those that match.

    If candidate is not marked as foreign, then the user agent must discard the failed load and instead continue along these steps using candidate as the resource. The document's address, if appropriate, will still be the originally requested URL, not the fallback URL, but the user agent may indicate to the user that the original page load failed, that the page used was a fallback resource, and what the URL of the fallback resource actually is.

    This does not affect the address of the resource from which Request-URIs are obtained, as used to set the document's referrer in the initialize the Document object steps below; they still use the value as computed by the original fetch algorithm.

  18. Resource handling: If the resource's out-of-band metadata (e.g. HTTP headers), not counting any type information (such as the Content-Type HTTP header), requires some sort of processing that will not affect the browsing context, then perform that processing and abort these steps.

    Such processing might be triggered by, amongst other things, the following:

    • HTTP status codes (e.g. 204 No Content or 205 Reset Content)
    • Network errors (e.g. the network interface being unavailable)
    • Cryptographic protocol failures (e.g. an incorrect TLS certificate)

    Responses with HTTP Content-Disposition headers specifying the attachment disposition type must be handled as a download.

    HTTP 401 responses that do not include a challenge recognized by the user agent must be processed as if they had no challenge, e.g. rendering the entity body as if the response had been 200 OK.

    User agents may show the entity body of an HTTP 401 response even when the response does include a recognized challenge, with the option to login being included in a non-modal fashion, to enable the information provided by the server to be used by the user before authenticating. Similarly, user agents should allow the user to authenticate (in a non-modal fashion) against authentication challenges included in other responses such as HTTP 200 OK responses, effectively allowing resources to present HTTP login forms without requiring their use.

  19. Let type be the sniffed type of the resource.

  20. If the user agent has been configured to process resources of the given type using some mechanism other than rendering the content in a browsing context, then skip this step. Otherwise, if the type is one of the following types, jump to the appropriate entry in the following list, and process the resource as described there:

    "text/html"
    Follow the steps given in the HTML document section, and then, once they have completed, abort this navigate algorithm.
    "application/xml"
    "text/xml"
    "image/svg+xml"
    "application/xhtml+xml"
    Any other type ending in "+xml" that is not an explicitly supported XML type
    Follow the steps given in the XML document section. If that section determines that the content is not to be displayed as a generic XML document, then proceed to the next step in this overall set of steps. Otherwise, once the steps given in the XML document section have completed, abort this navigate algorithm.
    "text/plain"
    Follow the steps given in the plain text file section, and then, once they have completed, abort this navigate algorithm.
    "multipart/x-mixed-replace"
    Follow the steps given in the multipart/x-mixed-replace section, and then, once they have completed, abort this navigate algorithm.
    A supported image, video, or audio type
    Follow the steps given in the media section, and then, once they have completed, abort this navigate algorithm.
    A type that will use an external application to render the content in the browsing context
    Follow the steps given in the plugin section, and then, once they have completed, abort this navigate algorithm.

    An explicitly supported XML type is one for which the user agent is configured to use an external application to render the content (either a plugin rendering directly in the browsing context, or a separate application), or one for which the user agent has dedicated processing rules (e.g. a Web browser with a built-in Atom feed viewer would be said to explicitly support the application/atom+xml MIME type), or one for which the user agent has a dedicated handler (e.g. one registered using registerContentHandler()).

    Setting the document's address: If there is no override URL, then any Document created by these steps must have its address set to the URL that was originally to be fetched, ignoring any other data that was used to obtain the resource (e.g. the entity body in the case of a POST submission is not part of the document's address, nor is the URL of the fallback resource in the case of the original load having failed and that URL having been found to match a fallback namespace). However, if there is an override URL, then any Document created by these steps must have its address set to that URL instead.

    An override URL is set when dereferencing a javascript: URL and when performing an overridden reload.

    Initializing a new Document object: when a Document is created as part of the above steps, the user agent will be required to additionally run the following algorithm after creating the new object:

    1. Create a new Window object, and associate it with the Document, with one exception: if the browsing context's only entry in its session history is the about:blank Document that was added when the browsing context was created, and navigation is occurring with replacement enabled, and that Document has the same origin as the new Document, then use the Window object of that Document instead, and change the document attribute of the Window object to point to the new Document.

    2. Set the document's referrer to the address of the resource from which Request-URIs are obtained as determined when the fetch algorithm obtained the resource, if that algorithm was used and determined such a value; otherwise, set it to the empty string.

    3. Implement the sandboxing for the Document.

    4. If the active sandboxing flag set of the Document's browsing context or any of its ancestor browsing contexts (if any) have the sandboxed fullscreen browsing context flag set, then skip this step.

      If the Document's browsing context has a browsing context container and either it is not an iframe element, or it does not have the allowfullscreen attribute specified, or its Document does not have the fullscreen enabled flag set, then also skip this step.

      Otherwise, set the Document's fullscreen enabled flag.

  21. Otherwise, the document's type is such that the resource will not affect the browsing context, e.g. because the resource is to be handed to an external application or because it is an unknown type that will be processed as a download. Process the resource appropriately.

When a resource is handled by passing its URL or data to an external software package separate from the user agent (e.g. handing a mailto: URL to a mail client, or a Word document to a word processor), user agents should attempt to mitigate the risk that this is an attempt to exploit the target software, e.g. by prompting the user to confirm that the source browsing context's active document's origin is to be allowed to invoke the specified software. In particular, if the navigate algorithm, when it was invoked, was not allowed to show a popup, the user agent should not invoke the external software package without prior user confirmation.

For example, there could be a vulnerability in the target software's URL handler which a hostile page would attempt to exploit by tricking a user into clicking a link.


Some of the sections below, to which the above algorithm defers in certain cases, require the user agent to update the session history with the new page. When a user agent is required to do this, it must queue a task (associated with the Document object of the current entry, not the new one) to run the following steps:

  1. Unload the Document object of the current entry, with the recycle parameter set to false.

    If this instance of the navigation algorithm is canceled while this step is running the unload a document algorithm, then the unload a document algorithm must be allowed to run to completion, but this instance of the navigation algorithm must not run beyond this step. (In particular, for instance, the cancelation of this algorithm does not abort any event dispatch or script execution occurring as part of unloading the document or its descendants.)

  2. If the navigation was initiated for entry update of an entry
    1. Replace the Document of the entry being updated, and any other entries that referenced the same document as that entry, with the new Document.

    2. Traverse the history to the new entry.

    This can only happen if the entry being updated is not the current entry, and can never happen with replacement enabled. (It happens when the user tried to traverse to a session history entry that no longer had a Document object.)

    Otherwise
    1. Remove all the entries in the browsing context's session history after the current entry. If the current entry is the last entry in the session history, then no entries are removed.

      This doesn't necessarily have to affect the user agent's user interface.

    2. Append a new entry at the end of the History object representing the new resource and its Document object and related state.

    3. Traverse the history to the new entry. If the navigation was initiated with replacement enabled, then the traversal must itself be initiated with replacement enabled.

  3. The navigation algorithm has now matured.

  4. Fragment identifier loop: Spin the event loop for a user-agent-defined amount of time, as desired by the user agent implementor. (This is intended to allow the user agent to optimize the user experience in the face of performance concerns.)

  5. If the Document object has no parser, or its parser has stopped parsing, or the user agent has reason to believe the user is no longer interested in scrolling to the fragment identifier, then abort these steps.

  6. Scroll to the fragment identifier given in the document's address. If this fails to find an indicated part of the document, then return to the fragment identifier loop step.

The task source for this task is the networking task source.

6.6.2 Page load processing model for HTML files

When an HTML document is to be loaded in a browsing context, the user agent must queue a task to create a Document object, mark it as being an HTML document, set its content type to "text/html", initialize the Document object, and finally create an HTML parser and associate it with the Document. Each task that the networking task source places on the task queue while the fetching algorithm runs must then fill the parser's input byte stream with the fetched bytes and cause the HTML parser to perform the appropriate processing of the input stream.

The input byte stream converts bytes into characters for use in the tokenizer. This process relies, in part, on character encoding information found in the real Content-Type metadata of the resource; the "sniffed type" is not used for this purpose.

When no more bytes are available, the user agent must queue a task for the parser to process the implied EOF character, which eventually causes a load event to be fired.

After creating the Document object, but before any script execution, certainly before the parser stops, the user agent must update the session history with the new page.

Application cache selection happens in the HTML parser.

The task source for the two tasks mentioned in this section must be the networking task source.

6.6.3 Page load processing model for XML files

When faced with displaying an XML file inline, user agents must follow the requirements defined in the XML and Namespaces in XML recommendations, RFC 3023, DOM, and other relevant specifications to create a Document object and a corresponding XML parser. [XML] [XMLNS] [RFC3023] [DOM]

At the time of writing, the XML specification community had not actually yet specified how XML and the DOM interact.

After the Document is created, the user agent must initialize the Document object.

The actual HTTP headers and other metadata, not the headers as mutated or implied by the algorithms given in this specification, are the ones that must be used when determining the character encoding according to the rules given in the above specifications. Once the character encoding is established, the document's character encoding must be set to that character encoding.

If the root element, as parsed according to the XML specifications cited above, is found to be an html element with an attribute manifest whose value is not the empty string, then, as soon as the element is inserted into the document, the user agent must resolve the value of that attribute relative to that element, and if that is successful, must apply the URL serializer algorithm to the resulting parsed URL with the exclude fragment flag set to obtain manifest URL, and then run the application cache selection algorithm with manifest URL as the manifest URL, passing in the newly-created Document. Otherwise, if the attribute is absent, its value is the empty string, or resolving its value fails, then as soon as the root element is inserted into the document, the user agent must run the application cache selection algorithm with no manifest, and passing in the Document.

Because the processing of the manifest attribute happens only once the root element is parsed, any URLs referenced by processing instructions before the root element (such as <?xml-stylesheet?> PIs) will be fetched from the network and cannot be cached.

User agents may examine the namespace of the root Element node of this Document object to perform namespace-based dispatch to alternative processing tools, e.g. determining that the content is actually a syndication feed and passing it to a feed handler. If such processing is to take place, abort the steps in this section, and jump to the next step (labeled non-document content) in the navigate steps above.

Otherwise, then, with the newly created Document, the user agent must update the session history with the new page. User agents may do this before the complete document has been parsed (thus achieving incremental rendering), and must do this before any scripts are to be executed.

Error messages from the parse process (e.g. XML namespace well-formedness errors) may be reported inline by mutating the Document.

6.6.4 Page load processing model for text files

When a plain text document is to be loaded in a browsing context, the user agent must queue a task to create a Document object, mark it as being an HTML document, set its content type to "text/plain", initialize the Document object, create an HTML parser, associate it with the Document, act as if the tokenizer had emitted a start tag token with the tag name "pre" followed by a single U+000A LINE FEED (LF) character, and switch the HTML parser's tokenizer to the PLAINTEXT state. Each task that the networking task source places on the task queue while the fetching algorithm runs must then fill the parser's input byte stream with the fetched bytes and cause the HTML parser to perform the appropriate processing of the input stream.

The rules for how to convert the bytes of the plain text document into actual characters, and the rules for actually rendering the text to the user, are defined in RFC 2046, RFC 3676, and subsequent versions thereof. [RFC2046] [RFC3676]

The document's character encoding must be set to the character encoding used to decode the document.

Upon creation of the Document object, the user agent must run the application cache selection algorithm with no manifest, and passing in the newly-created Document.

When no more bytes are available, the user agent must queue a task for the parser to process the implied EOF character, which eventually causes a load event to be fired.

After creating the Document object, but potentially before the page has finished parsing, the user agent must update the session history with the new page.

User agents may add content to the head element of the Document, e.g. linking to a style sheet or a binding, providing script, giving the document a title, etc.

In particular, if the user agent supports the Format=Flowed feature of RFC 3676 then the user agent would need to apply extra styling to cause the text to wrap correctly and to handle the quoting feature. This could be performed using, e.g., a binding or a CSS extension.

The task source for the two tasks mentioned in this section must be the networking task source.

6.6.5 Page load processing model for multipart/x-mixed-replace resources

When a resource with the type multipart/x-mixed-replace is to be loaded in a browsing context, the user agent must parse the resource using the rules for multipart types. [RFC2046]

For each body part obtained from the resource, the user agent must run a new instance of the navigate algorithm, starting from the resource handling step, using the new body part as the resource being navigated, with replacement enabled if a previous body part from the same resource resulted in a Document object being created and initialized, and otherwise using the same setup as the navigate attempt that caused this section to be invoked in the first place.

For the purposes of algorithms processing these body parts as if they were complete stand-alone resources, the user agent must act as if there were no more bytes for those resources whenever the boundary following the body part is reached.

Thus, load events (and for that matter unload events) do fire for each body part loaded.

6.6.6 Page load processing model for media

When an image, video, or audio resource is to be loaded in a browsing context, the user agent should create a Document object, mark it as being an HTML document, set its content type to the sniffed MIME type of the resource (type in the navigate algorithm), initialize the Document object, append an html element to the Document, append a head element and a body element to the html element, append an element host element for the media, as described below, to the body element, and set the appropriate attribute of the element host element, as described below, to the address of the image, video, or audio resource.

The element host element to create for the media is the element given in the table below in the second cell of the row whose first cell describes the media. The appropriate attribute to set is the one given by the third cell in that same row.

Type of media Element for the media Appropriate attribute
Image img src
Video video src
Audio audio src

Then, the user agent must act as if it had stopped parsing.

Upon creation of the Document object, the user agent must run the application cache selection algorithm with no manifest, and passing in the newly-created Document.

After creating the Document object, but potentially before the page has finished fully loading, the user agent must update the session history with the new page.

User agents may add content to the head element of the Document, or attributes to the element host element, e.g. to link to a style sheet or a binding, to provide a script, to give the document a title, to make the media autoplay, etc.

6.6.7 Page load processing model for content that uses plugins

When a resource that requires an external resource to be rendered is to be loaded in a browsing context, the user agent should create a Document object, mark it as being an HTML document and mark it as being a plugin document, set its content type to the sniffed MIME type of the resource (type in the navigate algorithm), initialize the Document object, append an html element to the Document, append a head element and a body element to the html element, append an embed to the body element, and set the src attribute of the embed element to the address of the resource.

The term plugin document is used by the Content Security Policy specification as part of the mechanism that ensures iframes can't be used to evade plugin-types directives. [CSP]

Then, the user agent must act as if it had stopped parsing.

Upon creation of the Document object, the user agent must run the application cache selection algorithm with no manifest, and passing in the newly-created Document.

After creating the Document object, but potentially before the page has finished fully loading, the user agent must update the session history with the new page.

User agents may add content to the head element of the Document, or attributes to the embed element, e.g. to link to a style sheet or a binding, or to give the document a title.

If the Document's active sandboxing flag set has its sandboxed plugins browsing context flag set, the synthesized embed element will fail to render the content if the relevant plugin cannot be secured.

6.6.8 Page load processing model for inline content that doesn't have a DOM

When the user agent is to display a user agent page inline in a browsing context, the user agent should create a Document object, mark it as being an HTML document, set its content type to "text/html", initialize the Document object, and then either associate that Document with a custom rendering that is not rendered using the normal Document rendering rules, or mutate that Document until it represents the content the user agent wants to render.

Once the page has been set up, the user agent must act as if it had stopped parsing.

Upon creation of the Document object, the user agent must run the application cache selection algorithm with no manifest, passing in the newly-created Document.

After creating the Document object, but potentially before the page has been completely set up, the user agent must update the session history with the new page.

6.6.9 Navigating to a fragment identifier

When a user agent is supposed to navigate to a fragment identifier, then the user agent must run the following steps:

  1. Remove all the entries in the browsing context's session history after the current entry. If the current entry is the last entry in the session history, then no entries are removed.

    This doesn't necessarily have to affect the user agent's user interface.

  2. Remove any tasks queued by the history traversal task source that are associated with any Document objects in the top-level browsing context's document family.

  3. Append a new entry at the end of the History object representing the new resource and its Document object and related state. Its URL must be set to the address to which the user agent was navigating. The title must be left unset.

  4. Traverse the history to the new entry, with the asynchronous events flag set. This will scroll to the fragment identifier given in what is now the document's address.

If the scrolling fails because the relevant ID has not yet been parsed, then the original navigation algorithm will take care of the scrolling instead, as the last few steps of its update the session history with the new page algorithm.


When the user agent is required to scroll to the fragment identifier and the indicated part of the document, if any, is being rendered, the user agent must either change the scrolling position of the document using the following algorithm, or perform some other action such that the indicated part of the document is brought to the user's attention. If there is no indicated part, or if the indicated part is not being rendered, then the user agent must do nothing. The aforementioned algorithm is as follows:

  1. Let target be the indicated part of the document, as defined below.

  2. If target is the top of the document, then scroll to the beginning of the document for the Document, and abort these steps. [CSSOMVIEW]

  3. Use the scroll an element into view algorithm to scroll target into view, with the align to top flag set. [CSSOMVIEW]

  4. Run the focusing steps for that element.

The indicated part of the document is the one that the fragment identifier, if any, identifies. The semantics of the fragment identifier in terms of mapping it to a specific DOM Node is defined by the specification that defines the MIME type used by the Document (for example, the processing of fragment identifiers for XML MIME types is the responsibility of RFC3023). [RFC3023]

For HTML documents (and HTML MIME types), the following processing model must be followed to determine what the indicated part of the document is.

  1. Apply the URL parser algorithm to the URL, and let fragid be the fragment component of the resulting parsed URL.

  2. If fragid is the empty string, then the indicated part of the document is the top of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  3. Let fragid bytes be the result of percent-decoding fragid.

  4. Let decoded fragid be the result of applying the UTF-8 decoder algorithm to fragid bytes. If the UTF-8 decoder emits a decoder error, abort the decoder and instead jump to the step labeled no decoded fragid.

  5. If there is an element in the DOM that has an ID exactly equal to decoded fragid, then the first such element in tree order is the indicated part of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  6. No decoded fragid: If there is an a element in the DOM that has a name attribute whose value is exactly equal to fragid (not decoded fragid), then the first such element in tree order is the indicated part of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  7. If fragid is an ASCII case-insensitive match for the string top, then the indicated part of the document is the top of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  8. Otherwise, there is no indicated part of the document.

For the purposes of the interaction of HTML with Selectors' :target pseudo-class, the target element is the indicated part of the document, if that is an element; otherwise there is no target element. [SELECTORS]

The task source for the task mentioned in this section must be the DOM manipulation task source.

6.6.10 History traversal

When a user agent is required to traverse the history to a specified entry, optionally with replacement enabled, and optionally with the asynchronous events flag set, the user agent must act as follows.

This algorithm is not just invoked when explicitly going back or forwards in the session history — it is also invoked in other situations, for example when navigating a browsing context, as part of updating the session history with the new page.

  1. If there is no longer a Document object for the entry in question, navigate the browsing context to the resource for that entry to perform an entry update of that entry, and abort these steps. The "navigate" algorithm reinvokes this "traverse" algorithm to complete the traversal, at which point there is a Document object and so this step gets skipped. The navigation must be done using the same source browsing context as was used the first time this entry was created. (This can never happen with replacement enabled.)

    If the resource was obtained usign a non-idempotent action, for example a POST form submission, or if the resource is no longer available, for example because the computer is now offline and the page wasn't cached, navigating to it again might not be possible. In this case, the navigation will result in a different page than previously; for example, it might be an error message explaining the problem or offering to resubmit the form.

  2. If the current entry's title was not set by the pushState() or replaceState() methods, then set its title to the value returned by the document.title IDL attribute.

  3. If appropriate, update the current entry in the browsing context's Document object's History object to reflect any state that the user agent wishes to persist. The entry is then said to be an entry with persisted user state.

  4. If the specified entry has a different Document object than the current entry, then run the following substeps:

    1. Remove any tasks queued by the history traversal task source that are associated with any Document objects in the top-level browsing context's document family.

    2. If the origin of the Document of the specified entry is not the same as the origin of the Document of the current entry, then run the following sub-sub-steps:

      1. The current browsing context name must be stored with all the entries in the history that are associated with Document objects with the same origin as the active document and that are contiguous with the current entry.

      2. If the browsing context is a top-level browsing context, but not an auxiliary browsing context, then the browsing context's browsing context name must be unset.

    3. Make the specified entry's Document object the active document of the browsing context.

    4. If the specified entry has a browsing context name stored with it, then run the following sub-sub-steps:

      1. Set the browsing context's browsing context name to the name stored with the specified entry.

      2. Clear any browsing context names stored with all entries in the history that are associated with Document objects with the same origin as the new active document and that are contiguous with the specified entry.

    5. If the specified entry's Document has any form controls whose autofill field name is "off", invoke the reset algorithm of each of those elements.

    6. If the current document readiness of the specified entry's Document is "complete", queue a task to run the following sub-sub-steps:

      1. If the Document's page showing flag is true, then abort this task (i.e. don't fire the event below).

      2. Set the Document's page showing flag to true.

      3. Run any session history document visibility change steps for Document that are defined by other applicable specifications.

        This is specifically intended for use by the Page Visibility specification. [PAGEVIS]

      4. Fire a trusted event with the name pageshow at the Window object of that Document, but with its target set to the Document object (and the currentTarget set to the Window object), using the PageTransitionEvent interface, with the persisted attribute initialized to true. This event must not bubble, must not be cancelable, and has no default action.

  5. Set the document's address to the URL of the specified entry.

  6. If the specified entry has a URL whose fragment identifier differs from that of the current entry's when compared in a case-sensitive manner, and the two share the same Document object, then let hash changed be true, and let old URL be the URL of the current entry and new URL be the URL of the specified entry. Otherwise, let hash changed be false.

  7. If the traversal was initiated with replacement enabled, remove the entry immediately before the specified entry in the session history.

  8. If the specified entry is not an entry with persisted user state, but its URL has a fragment identifier, scroll to the fragment identifier.

  9. If the entry is an entry with persisted user state, the user agent may update aspects of the document and its rendering, for instance the scroll position or values of form fields, that it had previously recorded.

    This can even include updating the dir attribute of textarea elements or input elements whose type attribute is in either the Text state or the Search state, if the persisted state includes the directionality of user input in such controls.

  10. If the entry is a state object entry, let state be a structured clone of that state object. Otherwise, let state be null.

  11. Set history.state to state.

  12. Let state changed be true if the Document of the specified entry has a latest entry, and that entry is not the specified entry; otherwise let it be false.

  13. Let the latest entry of the Document of the specified entry be the specified entry.

  14. If the asynchronous events flag is not set, then run the following steps synchronously. Otherwise, the asynchronous events flag is set; queue a task to run the following substeps.

    1. If state changed is true, fire a trusted event with the name popstate at the Window object of the Document, using the PopStateEvent interface, with the state attribute initialized to the value of state. This event must bubble but not be cancelable and has no default action.

    2. If hash changed is true, then fire a trusted event with the name hashchange at the browsing context's Window object, using the HashChangeEvent interface, with the oldURL attribute initialized to old URL and the newURL attribute initialized to new URL. This event must bubble but not be cancelable and has no default action.

  15. The current entry is now the specified entry.

The task source for the tasks mentioned above is the DOM manipulation task source.

6.6.10.1 The PopStateEvent interface
[Constructor(DOMString type, optional PopStateEventInit eventInitDict), Exposed=Window,Worker]
interface PopStateEvent : Event {
  readonly attribute any state;
};

dictionary PopStateEventInit : EventInit {
  any state;
};
event . state

Returns a copy of the information that was provided to pushState() or replaceState().

The state attribute must return the value it was initialized to. When the object is created, this attribute must be initialized to null. It represents the context information for the event, or null, if the state represented is the initial state of the Document.

6.6.10.2 The HashChangeEvent interface
[Constructor(DOMString type, optional HashChangeEventInit eventInitDict), Exposed=Window,Worker]
interface HashChangeEvent : Event {
  readonly attribute DOMString oldURL;
  readonly attribute DOMString newURL;
};

dictionary HashChangeEventInit : EventInit {
  DOMString oldURL;
  DOMString newURL;
};
event . oldURL

Returns the URL of the session history entry that was previously current.

event . newURL

Returns the URL of the session history entry that is now current.

The oldURL attribute must return the value it was initialized to. When the object is created, this attribute must be initialized to null. It represents context information for the event, specifically the URL of the session history entry that was traversed from.

The newURL attribute must return the value it was initialized to. When the object is created, this attribute must be initialized to null. It represents context information for the event, specifically the URL of the session history entry that was traversed to.

6.6.10.3 The PageTransitionEvent interface
[Constructor(DOMString type, optional PageTransitionEventInit eventInitDict), Exposed=Window,Worker]
interface PageTransitionEvent : Event {
  readonly attribute boolean persisted;
};

dictionary PageTransitionEventInit : EventInit {
  boolean persisted;
};
event . persisted

For the pageshow event, returns false if the page is newly being loaded (and the load event will fire). Otherwise, returns true.

For the pagehide event, returns false if the page is going away for the last time. Otherwise, returns true, meaning that (if nothing conspires to make the page unsalvageable) the page might be reused if the user navigates back to this page.

Things that can cause the page to be unsalvageable include:

The persisted attribute must return the value it was initialized to. When the object is created, this attribute must be initialized to false. It represents the context information for the event.

6.6.11 Unloading documents

A Document has a salvageable state, which must initially be true, a fired unload flag, which must initially be false, and a page showing flag, which must initially be false. The page showing flag is used to ensure that scripts receive pageshow and pagehide events in a consistent manner (e.g. that they never receive two pagehide events in a row without an intervening pageshow, or vice versa).

Event loops have a termination nesting level counter, which must initially be zero.

When a user agent is to prompt to unload a document, it must run the following steps.

  1. Increase the event loop's termination nesting level by one.

  2. Increase the Document's ignore-opens-during-unload counter by one.

  3. Let event be a new trusted BeforeUnloadEvent event object with the name beforeunload, which does not bubble but is cancelable.

  4. Dispatch: Dispatch event at the Document's Window object.

  5. Decrease the event loop's termination nesting level by one.

  6. Release the storage mutex.

  7. If any event listeners were triggered by the earlier dispatch step, then set the Document's salvageable state to false.

  8. If the returnValue attribute of the event object is not the empty string, or if the event was canceled, then the user agent should ask the user to confirm that they wish to unload the document.

    The prompt shown by the user agent may include the string of the returnValue attribute, or some leading subset thereof. (A user agent may want to truncate the string to 1024 characters for display, for instance.)

    The user agent must pause while waiting for the user's response.

    If the user did not confirm the page navigation, then the user agent refused to allow the document to be unloaded.

  9. If this algorithm was invoked by another instance of the "prompt to unload a document" algorithm (i.e. through the steps below that invoke this algorithm for all descendant browsing contexts), then jump to the step labeled end.

  10. Let descendants be the list of the descendant browsing contexts of the Document.

  11. If descendants is not an empty list, then for each browsing context b in descendants run the following substeps:

    1. Prompt to unload the active document of the browsing context b. If the user refused to allow the document to be unloaded, then the user implicitly also refused to allow this document to be unloaded; jump to the step labeled end.

    2. If the salvageable state of the active document of the browsing context b is false, then set the salvageable state of this document to false also.

  12. End: Decrease the Document's ignore-opens-during-unload counter by one.

When a user agent is to unload a document, it must run the following steps. These steps are passed an argument, recycle, which is either true or false, indicating whether the Document object is going to be re-used. (This is set by the document.open() method.)

  1. Increase the event loop's termination nesting level by one.

  2. Increase the Document's ignore-opens-during-unload counter by one.

  3. If the Document's page showing flag is false, then jump to the step labeled unload event below (i.e. skip firing the pagehide event and don't rerun the unloading document visibility change steps).

  4. Set the Document's page showing flag to false.

  5. Fire a trusted event with the name pagehide at the Window object of the Document, but with its target set to the Document object (and the currentTarget set to the Window object), using the PageTransitionEvent interface, with the persisted attribute initialized to true if the Document object's salvageable state is true, and false otherwise. This event must not bubble, must not be cancelable, and has no default action.

  6. Run any unloading document visibility change steps for Document that are defined by other applicable specifications.

    This is specifically intended for use by the Page Visibility specification. [PAGEVIS]

  7. Unload event: If the Document's fired unload flag is false, fire a simple event named unload at the Document's Window object.

  8. Decrease the event loop's termination nesting level by one.

  9. Release the storage mutex.

  10. If any event listeners were triggered by the earlier unload event step, then set the Document object's salvageable state to false and set the Document's fired unload flag to true.

  11. Run any unloading document cleanup steps for Document that are defined by this specification and other applicable specifications.

  12. If this algorithm was invoked by another instance of the "unload a document" algorithm (i.e. by the steps below that invoke this algorithm for all descendant browsing contexts), then jump to the step labeled end.

  13. Let descendants be the list of the descendant browsing contexts of the Document.

  14. If descendants is not an empty list, then for each browsing context b in descendants run the following substeps:

    1. Unload the active document of the browsing context b with the recycle parameter set to false.

    2. If the salvageable state of the active document of the browsing context b is false, then set the salvageable state of this document to false also.

  15. If both the Document's salvageable state and recycle are false, then the Document's browsing context must discard the Document.

  16. End: Decrease the Document's ignore-opens-during-unload counter by one.

This specification defines the following unloading document cleanup steps. Other specifications can define more.

  1. Make disappear any WebSocket objects that were created by the WebSocket() constructor from the Document's Window object.

    If this affected any WebSocket objects, then set Document's salvageable state to false.

  2. If the Document's salvageable state is false, forcibly close any EventSource objects that whose constructor was invoked from the Document's Window object.

  3. If the Document's salvageable state is false, empty the Document's Window's list of active timers.

6.6.11.1 The BeforeUnloadEvent interface
interface BeforeUnloadEvent : Event {
           attribute DOMString returnValue;
};
event . returnValue [ = value ]

Returns the current return value of the event (the message to show the user).

Can be set, to update the message.

There are no BeforeUnloadEvent-specific initialization methods.

The returnValue attribute represents the message to show the user. When the event is created, the attribute must be set to the empty string. On getting, it must return the last value it was set to. On setting, the attribute must be set to the new value.

6.6.12 Aborting a document load

If a Document is aborted, the user agent must run the following steps:

  1. Abort the active documents of every child browsing context. If this results in any of those Document objects having their salvageable state set to false, then set this Document's salvageable state to false also.

  2. Cancel any instances of the fetch algorithm in the context of this Document, discarding any tasks queued for them, and discarding any further data received from the network for them. If this resulted in any instances of the fetch algorithm being canceled or any queued tasks or any network data getting discarded, then set the Document's salvageable state to false.

  3. If the Document has an active parser, then abort that parser and set the Document's salvageable state to false.

User agents may allow users to explicitly invoke the abort a document algorithm for a Document. If the user does so, then, if that Document is an active document, the user agent should queue a task to fire a simple event named abort at that Document's Window object before invoking the abort algorithm.